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great video - but would have been great if the video was filmed by a helper while the job was actually being done.... and not just a clip showing the underside of a e36 ..

also just a thought but I thought that copper exposed to the elements is not great, thats y BMW and most car manufacturers use under body seleants/protection for breaklines etc

....but hey great dedication
 

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great video - but would have been great if the video was filmed by a helper while the job was actually being done.... and not just a clip showing the underside of a e36 ..

also just a thought but I thought that copper exposed to the elements is not great, thats y BMW and most car manufacturers use under body seleants/protection for breaklines etc

....but hey great dedication
Copper doesnt corrode like steel. Thats why copper is used for home plumbing :thumbsup
 

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MMmm true but home plumbing is not exposed to the outdoors and if its is - its covered with foam insualtion pipe padding to prevent mainly freezing, but on a vehicle espcially underneath the car wheres theres always water mud ETC, it may not rust but over a period of time it cant be great.

So easy to see why vehicle manufacuters including BMW dont use exposed copper,,, however copper breaklines are ok , its just the newby is new , coating the exposed pipes would have been the way,,,

even in home plumbling , and corgi plumbers dont leave pipes exposed they are normally painted, its not only a cosmetic issue but a safeguard

So the newby has done a great half job... which I dont thinks gonna be great for the another newbi who wants to replace break lines.

Also BMW's are not about micky mouse fixes, the job may be done (half done) , and the breaks will probably be ok , but its just work you expect on a FORD or Vauxhall and not a Bimma.

one more point Why do vehicle manufactures spend quite a bit of there profits on research,

In other words why do BMWs leave the factory with this protective seleant on the breaklines????
 

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Copper brake pipe is illegal in some countries hence why manufacturers don't use it, the copper brake pipe tubing that is used and sold here is very much different from the type found in a house, nearly 99% of tubing replaced on a car is done so with copper, even BMW don't sell the steel pipes pre bent, they will sell you a steel pipe that is straight and expect you to bend it to shape.

I know because I've wasted my time doing one on a e36.
 

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MMmm true but home plumbing is not exposed to the outdoors and if its is - its covered with foam insualtion pipe padding to prevent mainly freezing, but on a vehicle espcially underneath the car wheres theres always water mud ETC, it may not rust but over a period of time it cant be great.

So easy to see why vehicle manufacuters including BMW dont use exposed copper,,, however copper breaklines are ok , its just the newby is new , coating the exposed pipes would have been the way,,,

even in home plumbling , and corgi plumbers dont leave pipes exposed they are normally painted, its not only a cosmetic issue but a safeguard

So the newby has done a great half job... which I dont thinks gonna be great for the another newbi who wants to replace break lines.

Also BMW's are not about micky mouse fixes, the job may be done (half done) , and the breaks will probably be ok , but its just work you expect on a FORD or Vauxhall and not a Bimma.

one more point Why do vehicle manufactures spend quite a bit of there profits on research,

In other words why do BMWs leave the factory with this protective seleant on the breaklines????
you will find that most manufacturers put a lifespan on anypart and aslong as it can reach that lifespan then its ok. there are far to many variables involved with things like this, for instance you mention about being exposed, there is no way to have an average lenght of time in wich a certain part will be exposed due to cars being manufatured for different parts of the world, for instance the x5 and z3 were originally built in the us where they use us grade metals etc but they are sold all over the world, this is where the lifespan part comes into it, aslong as it can meet that lifespan target then its ok, as with most things you expect them to wear down over a period of time this is made even worse with todays attitude, everything is throw away so it dosnt matter if it lasts 5 or 50 years aslong as they get their money
 

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Here ya go this should help most people also............
Hi, it isnt as hard as what most people think to do the rear pipes, i did mine not long ago. To start...drop the exhaust at the centre section...you dont need to drop the rear end of the exhaust though, remove your under body cover so you can see around the propshaft area, Ideally you need to have the cars back end in the air with both wheels off and and on axle stands as high as you can get it..this is so you can remove the brake pipes easier from the side at the connection point rather than struggling for hours and most likely rounding off your 11mm pipe nut. Look at the pipe you want to remove first and release it from the connector by undoing it then do the same the other side...this is undoing the side connections which are easier to get first by the way, undo your tank straps and let it drop very slowly...making sure it is as empty as possible due to weight issues when it is dangling (i dont use a support method to hold it up as it gets in the way when wiggling around under the car) so run the car as low as you can fuel wise before attempting this procedure, Look for the under body connections for the brake pipes which are located near some fuel line connections undo your brake pipe connections then proceed to unclip your pipes and remove if you can...if not...chop as much of it away as you possibly can and then fit your new pipe as close as possible to your old one it doesnt have to follow the exact same route! it has to be above the tank and above the prop and going in the same kind of direction and have no kinks or possible issues where it may rub on something...tighten everything back up and replace everything you took off then bleed your brand new pipes through! sorted! sorry its just a quick idea of what to do as its late and im knacked! oh you need to undo the lid on your brake filler pot and sit it in its hole but not screw it down

I will not be held liable for prosectution or imprisonment for any damge to yourself or your car be it via death or injury through the words I have popped upon your screen!
 

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I'm about to give this a go but have read online that there are different types of flares. Can I anybody tell me what type of flaring kit I should buy? Should it be metric or imperial? Will the cheap ones on ebay do the job?
 
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