BMW Forums : BimmerForums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey people.

I thought I should post this, before I do anything which could possibly damage my equipment or car.

I have an Alpine dual voice sub woofer and as the photo shows it has 4 wires coming from it. I also have an Alpine v12 amp. (Its quite an old model but it was recommended to be quite reliable so I went for it).

Ive read about wiring subwoofers in series, parallel and about ohms etc on various websites.

Can I connect both positive wires from the sub to the positive channel 3, and both the negative wires to negative channel 4? Would this setup work or would I be damaging the system? I am really hoping I do not have to re-wire the sub.

The amplifier says bridged on it, so that is why I presume this setup is ok, but would anyone like to confirm this or say otherwise?


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
710 Posts
What are the ratings of the amplifier and of the driver in your sub box?
 

·
Legendary BFuk Member
Joined
·
12,959 Posts
My first set up attempt would be:-

Negative 1 far left top and positive 1 far right top

Negative 2 far left bottom and positive 2 far right bottom

This would be taking advantage of the BRIDGE function which will take the power from both channel 1 and 2 for one coil and both 3 and 4 for the other coil. I've never used dual coil but I would imagine it would be imperative that the settings are identically set up
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
880 Posts
With a dual coil woofer and a stereo amp that's capable of being bridged you'll probably get the best output by using the individual channels on the amp, but it all depends on the load the amp was designed to drive and the characteristics of the woofer.

You have 3 options :

1) Use one coil one each channel.
2) Bridge the amp and drive the coils in series.
3) Bridge the amp and drive the colis in parallel.

With option 1 you are pretty safe.

With option 2 the resistance of the combined coils may be too low for the amp, it will also provide quite a 'difficult' load with the possibility of peeks and troughs in the resistance as the frequency changes.

With option 3 the resistance of the combined coils will be higher, but probably above the most efficient range of the amp, so it won't make the best use of what you have.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
344 Posts
these may help bud:

http://akamaipix.crutchfield.com/ca/learningcenter/car/subwoofer_wiring/1DVC_2-ohm_2ch.jpg

http://akamaipix.crutchfield.com/ca/learningcenter/car/subwoofer_wiring/1DVC_4-ohm_2ch.jpg

Dual voice coil subwoofers are becoming a popular choice among car audio enthusiasts who want more flexibility in wiring their sound systems. While typical subwoofers have a single voice coil, dual voice coil (DVC) subwoofers use two separate voice coils, each with its own connections, mounted on one cylinder, connected to a common cone.

The key difference between single and dual voice coil subwoofers is the multiple wiring options DVC subs offer:

Parallel: A dual 4-ohm voice coil subwoofer with its coils wired in parallel presents a 2-ohm load to your amplifier. Since an amplifier produces more wattage at a lower impedance, the parallel connection ensures you'll get the most output from your amp. In the same fashion, if you have a stereo amplifier and two DVC subs, wire both subs for 2-ohm impedance (one per channel) for maximum output.
Series: Series wiring lets you configure multiple woofers to one amplifier at an acceptable impedance. Wire both coils in series for an 8-ohm impedance, and then wire two 8-ohm subs together in parallel for 4-ohm total impedance (perfect for most 2-channel amps bridged to mono operation). Another example: if you have a high-powered 2-channel amplifier, wire four 8-ohm subs per channel (each channel sees a 2-ohm load).
Independent: You can wire each voice coil to a separate channel of your amplifier, if you prefer not to bridge your amp. Independent wiring is a nice option if you're wiring two DVC subs to a 4-channel amplifier — one voice coil per channel.
DVCs and high-performance amplifiers
Some amplifiers are designed with an unregulated power supply — these amps are favored by mobile audio competitors for their superior performance. An unregulated amp's power increases dramatically when it sees a lower impedance load. For example, an amplifier that produces 75 watts RMS x 2 channels at 4 ohms would double its power to 150 watts x 2 with a 2-ohm load. DVC subwoofers (particularly the dual 2-ohm models) give you the flexibility to wring every bit of power out of this type of amplifier.

Also, if you choose to add an unregulated amp as a power upgrade to your existing DVC subwoofer system, you can simply rewire your subs for optimum impedance. Remember that most car amps are stable down to 2 ohms in normal operation, and to 4 ohms in bridged mode. It's important to check your amp's manual for its operating parameters before hooking up a DVC sub wired for low impedance!

A DVC sub offers the same performance whether it's wired in series or parallel. Its power handling levels, frequency response, and other specifications do not change — the only difference is the impedance presented to the amplifier. As a result, you'll use the enclosure that's recommended for your sub, no matter how it's wired.

The Sub Box:

The type of bass you get from your component subwoofer doesn't depend on the woofer alone. You'll need a strong, tightly-constructed enclosure for optimum subwoofer performance. Speakers without an enclosure can't deliver full bass because the sound from the back of the speaker can cancel out some low frequencies emanating from the front of the speaker.

Using our box-building accessories, you might choose to construct your own box to create the enclosure size that you want. However, unless you have excellent craftsman skills and a solid understanding of enclosure volumes and other technical terms, you're better off purchasing a convenient, professional-looking pre-made enclosure.

Different types of boxes will produce different types of bass:

Sealed boxes: For deep, precise bass
A sealed box is an airtight enclosure housing your subwoofer. A sealed box is best for any music that demands tight, accurate bass. Expect flat response (not excessively boomy), deep bass extension, and excellent power handling. Since a sealed enclosure tends to require more power than a ported box, use an amplifier with ample wattage for optimum performance.

Ported boxes: For forceful bass
Ported boxes use a vent (called a port) to reinforce low bass response. You get more output than you would from a sealed box at any given amplifier wattage. Some people prefer the sound of ported boxes for rock, heavy metal, or any hard-driving music. Ported boxes can deliver deeper bass than sealed boxes, though they need to be much larger than sealed enclosures to accomplish that.

Bandpass boxes: Maximum slam
Bandpass boxes are a special type of ported box designed for maximum slam. The woofer is mounted inside a dual-chambered box (one chamber sealed, the other ported), with the sound waves emerging from the ported side. The sound that comes out of the port is extra loud within a narrow frequency range.

Because bandpass boxes are super efficient within that range, they tend to boom. Their aggressive sound is great for rap, reggae, and hard rock. Not all subwoofers work well in bandpass boxes, though; consult our product information or call one of our Advisors to be sure.

Free-air subwoofers
A free-air system consists of woofers mounted to a board attached to the rear deck or placed in the trunk against the rear seat. The trunk of the car acts as an enclosure which houses the subwoofer and isolates sound from the back of the speaker, solving the sound cancellation problem of subs without an enclosure.

Free-air systems save space and have flat frequency response. The woofer must be specifically designed for free-air use. The lack of a box makes them more convenient to install, but their power handling levels are usually much lower than their boxed counterparts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The ratings for my sub are:

MAX OUTPUT(W)
1000

RMS OUTPUT(W)
300

and the amplifier:

120Wx4CH Max.

320Wx2CH Max.

(4 Ohm, 14.4V)

at 12v 40W x 4CH RMS.

This does not mean all too much to me, I have just copied the information from the box.

I found a setup in parallel like this (top-right):

http://mobile.jlaudio.com/support_pages.php?page_id=161

Would this be the same thing as attaching two positives straight to once channel and the negatives both to another?

I read that attaching each wire to each channel may not be safe in case the amplifier does not delivery equal power to each terminal of the coils- is there some truth to that?

thanks for all the input so far
 

·
Legendary BFuk Member
Joined
·
12,959 Posts
these may help bud:

http://akamaipix.crutchfield.com/ca/learningcenter/car/subwoofer_wiring/1DVC_2-ohm_2ch.jpg

http://akamaipix.crutchfield.com/ca/learningcenter/car/subwoofer_wiring/1DVC_4-ohm_2ch.jpg

Dual voice coil subwoofers are becoming a popular choice among car audio enthusiasts who want more flexibility in wiring their sound systems. While typical subwoofers have a single voice coil, dual voice coil (DVC) subwoofers use two separate voice coils, each with its own connections, mounted on one cylinder, connected to a common cone.

The key difference between single and dual voice coil subwoofers is the multiple wiring options DVC subs offer:

Parallel: A dual 4-ohm voice coil subwoofer with its coils wired in parallel presents a 2-ohm load to your amplifier. Since an amplifier produces more wattage at a lower impedance, the parallel connection ensures you'll get the most output from your amp. In the same fashion, if you have a stereo amplifier and two DVC subs, wire both subs for 2-ohm impedance (one per channel) for maximum output.
Series: Series wiring lets you configure multiple woofers to one amplifier at an acceptable impedance. Wire both coils in series for an 8-ohm impedance, and then wire two 8-ohm subs together in parallel for 4-ohm total impedance (perfect for most 2-channel amps bridged to mono operation). Another example: if you have a high-powered 2-channel amplifier, wire four 8-ohm subs per channel (each channel sees a 2-ohm load).
Independent: You can wire each voice coil to a separate channel of your amplifier, if you prefer not to bridge your amp. Independent wiring is a nice option if you're wiring two DVC subs to a 4-channel amplifier — one voice coil per channel.
DVCs and high-performance amplifiers
Some amplifiers are designed with an unregulated power supply — these amps are favored by mobile audio competitors for their superior performance. An unregulated amp's power increases dramatically when it sees a lower impedance load. For example, an amplifier that produces 75 watts RMS x 2 channels at 4 ohms would double its power to 150 watts x 2 with a 2-ohm load. DVC subwoofers (particularly the dual 2-ohm models) give you the flexibility to wring every bit of power out of this type of amplifier.

Also, if you choose to add an unregulated amp as a power upgrade to your existing DVC subwoofer system, you can simply rewire your subs for optimum impedance. Remember that most car amps are stable down to 2 ohms in normal operation, and to 4 ohms in bridged mode. It's important to check your amp's manual for its operating parameters before hooking up a DVC sub wired for low impedance!

A DVC sub offers the same performance whether it's wired in series or parallel. Its power handling levels, frequency response, and other specifications do not change — the only difference is the impedance presented to the amplifier. As a result, you'll use the enclosure that's recommended for your sub, no matter how it's wired.

The Sub Box:

The type of bass you get from your component subwoofer doesn't depend on the woofer alone. You'll need a strong, tightly-constructed enclosure for optimum subwoofer performance. Speakers without an enclosure can't deliver full bass because the sound from the back of the speaker can cancel out some low frequencies emanating from the front of the speaker.

Using our box-building accessories, you might choose to construct your own box to create the enclosure size that you want. However, unless you have excellent craftsman skills and a solid understanding of enclosure volumes and other technical terms, you're better off purchasing a convenient, professional-looking pre-made enclosure.

Different types of boxes will produce different types of bass:

Sealed boxes: For deep, precise bass
A sealed box is an airtight enclosure housing your subwoofer. A sealed box is best for any music that demands tight, accurate bass. Expect flat response (not excessively boomy), deep bass extension, and excellent power handling. Since a sealed enclosure tends to require more power than a ported box, use an amplifier with ample wattage for optimum performance.

Ported boxes: For forceful bass
Ported boxes use a vent (called a port) to reinforce low bass response. You get more output than you would from a sealed box at any given amplifier wattage. Some people prefer the sound of ported boxes for rock, heavy metal, or any hard-driving music. Ported boxes can deliver deeper bass than sealed boxes, though they need to be much larger than sealed enclosures to accomplish that.

Bandpass boxes: Maximum slam
Bandpass boxes are a special type of ported box designed for maximum slam. The woofer is mounted inside a dual-chambered box (one chamber sealed, the other ported), with the sound waves emerging from the ported side. The sound that comes out of the port is extra loud within a narrow frequency range.

Because bandpass boxes are super efficient within that range, they tend to boom. Their aggressive sound is great for rap, reggae, and hard rock. Not all subwoofers work well in bandpass boxes, though; consult our product information or call one of our Advisors to be sure.

Free-air subwoofers
A free-air system consists of woofers mounted to a board attached to the rear deck or placed in the trunk against the rear seat. The trunk of the car acts as an enclosure which houses the subwoofer and isolates sound from the back of the speaker, solving the sound cancellation problem of subs without an enclosure.

Free-air systems save space and have flat frequency response. The woofer must be specifically designed for free-air use. The lack of a box makes them more convenient to install, but their power handling levels are usually much lower than their boxed counterparts.
You copied ans pasted that didn't you:rofl

:thumbsup
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
788 Posts
be careful what you do if you are unsure consult an audio dealer or installers for advice because it all boils down to ohms and wattage and if you wire out of sequence you will cause damage to 1 of your components
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
710 Posts
From the ratings you have given, I would be drawn to connect 1 coil to channel A, and the other coil to channel B, as this will then deliver 320w to the driver, and audio knowledge from building cabs and designing systems tells me that you should supply from 1.3 to 2x the rated RMS of the driver.

So in basic terms:
Driver (Speaker) = 300w RMS
Amp = 450w to 600w RMS

Your amp should never reach clipping stages (where it goes into the red), if it does, you need to upgrade as basically youre thrashing the tits off it and obviously it will sound dire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
MIX up alert ! and a few warnings for DVC subs

With a dual coil woofer and a stereo amp that's capable of being bridged you'll probably get the best output by using the individual channels on the amp, but it all depends on the load the amp was designed to drive and the characteristics of the woofer.

You have 3 options :

1) Use one coil one each channel.
2) Bridge the amp and drive the coils in series.
3) Bridge the amp and drive the colis in parallel.

With option 1 you are pretty safe.

With option 2 the resistance of the combined coils may be too low for the amp, it will also provide quite a 'difficult' load with the possibility of peeks and troughs in the resistance as the frequency changes.

With option 3 the resistance of the combined coils will be higher, but probably above the most efficient range of the amp, so it won't make the best use of what you have.

Richard, dude, u mixed up option 2 and 3.
if he has got the dual voice coil version of the Alpine type R (thats what it looks like), then its probably dual 4ohm coils.
so in series it will operate at 8ohms resistance.
wired in parallel it would only operate at 2ohms resistance

as long as your amp is 2ohm stable in briged mode you are safe.

WARNING, if connecting voice coils to different power sources, or even different channels of the same Amp,
the signal to both coils must be IDENTICAL,
that means
same power levels,
same gain settings,
same low pass filter settings
Same sub-sonic filter settings (not applicable to your amp).

if you dont give it a equal load, then you will melt the voice coils.

NOTE;
i think the best option is to bridge channel A to one coil and channel B to the other,
but the Above warning still applies.
that means
the sub will get 320w max on each channel/coil @4ohms,
which is more like 160RMS watts per channel/Coil @4ohms.
it is generally accpeted amongst audio experts that to get the most from a Sub the Amp should be of a higher rating so you're not "red lining" it for want of a better term.

Steviec_lj has a gud grasp on the concept.

Oh and that Sub is very strong, and is capable of
more then what the 300 watts Rms rating guide.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top