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Discussion Starter #1
Hey folks, I was wondering if anyone else is having problems being dazzled at night by these new cars with LED headlights?
The worst offenders seem to be Mercedes but some of the Audi and BMW ones are also blindingly bright.
The SUVs are worst as their headlights are predictably higher than normal cars and shine right into oncoming drivers faces. :LOL:
It's like they are driving at you with their full beams on and there's been a few occasions on dark roads where I've almost had to stop for being unable to see anything from being dazzled. Some of them are quite hazardous IMO.
Even being followed by such a car can be a pain as I often find the dazzle reflecting back off my mirrors to be distracting.
This got me wondering, is there any legal limit as to how bright a car's dipped beams can be? And do manufacturers take into account the need not to blind every other motorist when developing these increasingly powerful and complex lighting systems?
I have good eyesight and have never struggled with anything like this before but over the last few winters I've come to dread night time driving especially on unlit roads for this reason alone.
 

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me too,especially the indicators,,i flash folk who blind me,,looks like they have high beams on but they have not..
 

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Me too. I wonder if that excessive brightness is what the OEM delivers or whether the owner has "upgraded" to even brighter LEDs.
 

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I have two cars with xenons, one adaptives, both auto level and adjust while driving, have to have headlight washers....
I've been looking at a more powerful car for one daughter who's now a more experienced a driver, and LED headlights start to become viable, it seems though they have non of the self levelling attributes xenons have, sometimes see to the right of the headlight switch one up/down rotary, which tends to be the dashboard dimmer, and a second, much like the standard halogen headlight up/down control, so it looks like the controls imposed on xenons, hasn't been made on LED headlights.
Having said that, it depends, some do appear to have self levelling, it could be those that had xenons on earlier models converted to LED - by the manufacturer, and kept the nice self levelling ability.
It's also entirely possible that some adverts are claiming LEDs and don't have them...
But I suspect that LEDs are being fitted lower down the food chain as they're relatively cheap, and as soon as you load a car up they're pointing at the trees, when they were halogen they were easier to ignore, LEDs not so.
 

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its not really boy racer types(who change to sun blinding quality) that are blinding me,,its just normal "family" etc cars..seems that aims are off etc
 

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I have two cars with xenons, one adaptives, both auto level and adjust while driving, have to have headlight washers....
I've been looking at a more powerful car for one daughter who's now a more experienced a driver, and LED headlights start to become viable, it seems though they have non of the self levelling attributes xenons have, sometimes see to the right of the headlight switch one up/down rotary, which tends to be the dashboard dimmer, and a second, much like the standard halogen headlight up/down control, so it looks like the controls imposed on xenons, hasn't been made on LED headlights.
Having said that, it depends, some do appear to have self levelling, it could be those that had xenons on earlier models converted to LED - by the manufacturer, and kept the nice self levelling ability.
It's also entirely possible that some adverts are claiming LEDs and don't have them...
But I suspect that LEDs are being fitted lower down the food chain as they're relatively cheap, and as soon as you load a car up they're pointing at the trees, when they were halogen they were easier to ignore, LEDs not so.
Tbh my new 3 series has the LED headlights and I get people flashing me when I don’t even have my full beam on, usually when coming over the brow of a hill. I feel for them but at the same time they make night driving so much safer because they are so much brighter and then full beam is like turning the sun on!


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Discussion Starter #9
Tbh my new 3 series has the LED headlights and I get people flashing me when I don’t even have my full beam on, usually when coming over the brow of a hill. I feel for them but at the same time they make night driving so much safer because they are so much brighter and then full beam is like turning the sun on!


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Thats definitely the angle manufacturers use to sell them - safer night time driving due to better illumination and longer field of vision. But is it really safe overall if it causes other motorists to be temporarily blinded? I feel like they may have overlooked that part of the equation when developing them.

I remember back when xenons were the latest thing having a couple of blinding moments on hills, but they never bothered me in general.
The leveling system seemed to keep the dazzle below the eye line most of the time. That said, there was a lot fewer SUVs around back then which probably helped.
I had a new X5 following me a few nights ago and the headlights seemed to sit exactly at the height of my mirrors. It was awful, and incredibly distracting even from behind.
I don't know whether or not they are required to have self leveling like xenons (?) but some manufactures badly need to refine their LED tech and control the light output better before it makes night driving unbearable. Is it the DVLA or DfT that sets up the regulations for these kinds of things? I know in the US some of the LED options we get are not offered as they are too bright for regulations there.
 

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Thats definitely the angle manufacturers use to sell them - safer night time driving due to better illumination and longer field of vision. But is it really safe overall if it causes other motorists to be temporarily blinded? I feel like they may have overlooked that part of the equation when developing them.

I remember back when xenons were the latest thing having a couple of blinding moments on hills, but they never bothered me in general.
The leveling system seemed to keep the dazzle below the eye line most of the time. That said, there was a lot fewer SUVs around back then which probably helped.
I had a new X5 following me a few nights ago and the headlights seemed to sit exactly at the height of my mirrors. It was awful, and incredibly distracting even from behind.
I don't know whether or not they are required to have self leveling like xenons (?) but some manufactures badly need to refine their LED tech and control the light output better before it makes night driving unbearable. Is it the DVLA or DfT that sets up the regulations for these kinds of things? I know in the US some of the LED options we get are not offered as they are too bright for regulations there.
Maybe they should develop some night time sunglasses but really the issue is going to get worse once the Laser Lights filter down to the cheaper cars in about 5-10 year, we will have no retinas left after that!


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i rarely drive in the dark,,if it is, then its very early morning in winter months,,so not a lot of cars on the road,,maybe twice a week i drive in the dark in evenings...it is dangerous as you find yourself looking away from the on coming car..and as said cars following like x5's etc are bad when shining in rear view mirrors
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Indeed, we need more technology to combat the problems created by other technology! Sounds increasingly familiar! :rolleyes:

I found this video which gives an insight into the complexity of these adaptive LED systems. I'm just wondering how the correct operation of these systems can be tested/monitored, for example at the MOT test? A fault with any one of the components could render them unsafe and very dangerous to other motorists. I hate to think what setups like this will cost to maintain as they age!!

 

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Yeah, looks very similar to adaptive xenons, clever things with mirrors etc, driving down a bendy road with trees helps see what they do.... :)
And yes, auto dimming mirrors to cater against bright lights, that figures...
 

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Discussion Starter #15
It appears the main difference between these new LED systems and the older adaptive ones is these ones appear to run in "full beam" mode all the time (hence dazzlingly bright even in daylight!) but shift the light around claiming to avoid other driver's line of sight. Whereas the older adaptive systems were only shifting the dipped beam light around to see round bends etc.
And of course the old xenon and later "bi xenon" options only used a self leveling system. But in both cases the driver either selected full beam manually or they shut off automatically for oncoming traffic..... Not so anymore!
The new system seems to keep at least some of the LEDs at maximum brightness all the time. However the dazzle avoidance systems do not seem to be entirely effective and particularly in wet or foggy conditions where there is a lot of shine on the road surface or where the fog scatters the light, it is like drving right at the sun!! A real nuisance! :LOL:
By comparison I had an X-reg Audi following me a few days ago with the old xenons and apart from the subtle blue/violet tinge to the light I barely notice it. It was nice!
 
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