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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys, for anybody looking to squeeze some extra power out of their 320D or any of the turbo charged diesels, it's not as expensive as you might think. I know of a company who will build cores with any compressor wheel you specify and machine out your compressor housing to suit. Put it this way, I bought a new core £139, Had my compressor housing machined out £125 and delivery £9.95, that's it! and its not as if it's not a good quality unit either. It comes fitted with an upgraded 360 degree thrust bearing and step gap oil sealing rings and a full 12 month warranty. May be a little more expensive if you have a different model to mine!

Mine started out life as a GT1749V and now it is a GT1756 so +7mm on the compressor wheel and should be capable of 230bhp+ with a few other tasty mods. You can see in the pics that the new compressor wheel is also a lot taller as well as wider :)

Big step down from £500 for a recon hybrid or £1180 for a complete new hybrid unit.

IMG_20130730_144053.jpg IMG_20130730_144108.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Just a quick post. I'm currently half way through cleaning the donor turbo unit which I'm building before I take my old one off. The turbo had oil seal failure so there is a lot of oil and carbon deposits on the vanes and inside the turbine housing. Gladly though I have an ultrasonic cleaner so I took the vanes and ring off the compressor housing and popped them in. They came up quite well after a few repeat sessions in the cleaner. I wasn't too worried about putting them in water, or any chemicals for that matter as they are entirely stainless steel although I will be oiling them with silicone and teflon spray prior to assembling the unit.

Anyway here is a couple of pics. If anybody is interested in me doing the assembly of the unit I would be more than happy to post it on here :)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I will be posting pics later. By far the 2 most difficukt things to do are getting the vane's ring the right way round.. which sounds simple but is more difficult than it looks and getting the compressor housing lined up precisely.

Anyway keep an eye out later ;)
 

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Sorry if this is a silly question, but would I be right in thinking that if you did this mod then you would also need to have a custom remap applied to compensate for the extra boost? Or would you expect the ecu to notice the extra boost pressure and automatically adjust to it?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Its different to a petrol, you have to be very careful with the fuel to air ratio on a petrol. Too lean and it will burn holes in the piston, too rich and it just wont run so well
With a diesel fuel to air ratio isnt crucial. Diesels dont have a throttle body restricting the volume of air coming into the engine and can take in as muh air as they want. this turbo will benefit the standard engine map and you wouldnt HAVE to remap it if you didnt want to. The amount of boost is controlled by the amount of fuel that the ecu puts in so there will be no more than 10-15% increase in boost without a remap because it will be beyond the parameters of the standard map. So yes, in a word, to achieve 230 plus bhp it will need a remap but a remap is not essential.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Yep, although 9 times out of 10 that is down to the map. Sensor reading too high a value. I know because thats what mine does at the moment lol! It reads beyond the limit when you just rev at a stand still. Probably has some muck in it or I need a new sensor.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hi guys here are some pics of the rebuild process. If you wish to dismantle your turbo yourself, please do so at your own risk (I accept no responsibility), but generally if you read this guide FULLY BEFORE!! attempting anything, the process can be followed in reverse to disassemble yours. Please make sure if you are dissasembling yours that marking the position of components can be invaluable. I used a scribe to leave marks on the metal. Also during assembly I used an assembly oil which was part mineral oil, part silicone lubricant and part teflon based. I also used copper grease on the turbine housing bolts to prevent seizing.

Firstly we start with the vanes. I cleaned them in an ultrasonic bath. There were some stubborn carbon deposits so I used a brass brush to remove them. You can actually use a steel brush gently because stainless is a little harder than normal steel but I personally wouldn't.
IMAG0001_zpsb2dc7ff4.jpg

I did the same with the rotating ring, the rollers and the pins that hold the rollers in.
IMAG0002_zps7eb53aa1.jpg

Now when putting the ring onto the vanes it's important to get the ring on the right way around. It's easy enough to check as it only goes one of two ways. I will cover that later. You may want to consider putting the vanes together after you have put them into the turbine (Exhaust) housing.

When putting the ring on like each of the vanes up one by one in a clockwise or anti clockwise direction. Take your time, there is no rush. You will notice they are in banks of three. The way to get the ring in the right place is by looking for the 3 notches in the ring that are the closest together. if you look in the photo one of the notches is free. This notch is the one which the actuator uses to rotate the ring and alter their position. This is located right by a larger hole than the 3 smaller holes which hold the rollers. (pic)

When the ring is sitting in place put one of the pins through a roller then place it on the vane so that the roller sits on the vane and the pin pops up out of the top. Then you carefully lift the ring near the hole that is for the roller you want to put in and move the roller so that it holds the ring up off the body of the turbo, then gently locate the pin into its hole to keep the roller in place... Repeat that for the other 2 rollers until you have what you see in this pic.
IMAG0005_zps00cfc446.jpg

Now these are what hold the vane into position. The 3 spacers go underneath the vane pictured above. They go between the vane and the turbine (Exhaust) housing. It can be tricky putting them into place then lowering the vane into it because they tend to move so try and be as gentle as you can. I held fingers in the centre of the vane and lowered it in square then put the three bolts in to secure it.
IMAG0008_zps045d37a4.jpg

Pic of Turbine housing, the ring of the vanes should be facing at you as you look at this pic.
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This is what you should end up with
IMAG0012_zps6b075e0c.jpg

Then with the ring, rollers and pins fitted.
IMAG0013_zps4eb68b60.jpg

Now if you are following this in reverse you need to be VERY careful with this sealing ring. It is metal and can be reused but the mating surfaces have to be absolutely spotless and if you put so much as a tiny bend in it you may as well bin it! It is quite delicate so be careful with it and ONLY use a brass brush (shoe repair place sell them) so that you don't scratch it. This seal is very important, it stops exhaust gasses from escaping. Please also note the position of the tab at the bottom, it is facing up and away from the vanes.
IMAG0015_zps51914cb7.jpg

Now if you look at your core on the turbine end where it mates with the turbine housing that you have just built/disassembled you will notice that there are 4 holes that match, so this can only be fitted in one way. Easiest way to do it is to put the compressor housing on a table ( If you have removed the exhaust studs, if not in a vice and make sure vanes are closed i.e. not pointing outwards towards the hole the turbine sits in!) then lower the core onto it gently.. I cannot stress enough that you must take great care whilst doing this. If you were to damage the turbine even slightly it can have catastrophic effects later on when you start the car up! When it is roughly in place rotate the core until you feel it fall into place, then move the lever for the vane actuator until you feel this fall into place.

Now we will cover the ring being the right way around. It's pretty simple to tell really. if its the right way round the actuator lever will hit the screw stop, if not it will sit off it. Please don't try and force it, only slight pressure is enough to move it. If its the wrong way around go back and take the ring off, there are only two ways it can do so think of it like side A and side B. Mark it if you are disassembling it, usually a good idea :)

you should end up with this (sorry about quality) if you have it the correct way.
IMAG0016_zpsdc4dd96b.jpg

Now it's time to put the bolts that secure the turbine housing to the core back in. With the core facing you and the turbine on a table/in a vice, put each of these bolts with its washer on and only do up hand tight making sure you didn't forget the gasket ring for between the two. Once you have done that make sire you only use the ring end of a GOOD quality 10mm spanner.. not a cheap one! tighten one nut a little over hand tight then going in a clockwise motion missing 1 bolt out every time, do the same to the rest of the bolts until you are back where you started. It's important that you do this gradually and not just tighten one up really tight as the seal will not sit right and exhaust gasses will escape. gradually increase the tightness of the bolts using the same process until they are fairly tight but not too tight. If your knuckles go white at any point then that's too tight I would say. You don't want to over do it but at the same time you don't want to under do it either. dont forget the copper grease ;)

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Now that's one of the hard parts over.

Putting the compressor housing on looks relatively easy. But you will notice that it's alignment affects the position of the actuator which controls the vanes. Get that wrong and you will have serious problems! However there is a way of doing it. Firstly you will notice a dot (PIC) on the outer part of the compressor housing. This lines up with the oil drain hole on the side of the core. When you put the core on roughly line it up with the drain hole. Only hand tighten the bolts which hold the housing on and again be VERY careful when putting it on so you don't damage the compressor wheel!

IMAG0020_zpsadc9c2be.jpg

Once you have done that you will notice that the compressor housing will rotate, if not the bolts are too tight!

Now I don't have any pics after this point but it is fairly easy. All you have to do now is fit the actuator and align it. In order to do this you have to fit the little clip which holds it onto the lever on the core. Do that then put the two little 10mm bolts in which hold the actuator to the compressor housing. Now if you have done this correctly the lever will be off its stop. Now tighten just one of the bolts holding the compressor housing to the core up to hold it in place. Once you have done that look at the shaft on the actuator, you will notice it is marked and it should give you a good idea how far into the actuator it goes. Using a lever of some sort move the actuator, which is spring loaded, until it reaches the end of its travel marked on the shaft.. not always all the way in! then see if the lever on the core hits it's stop. If it falls short you need to rotate the compressor housing to compensate, if it hits before the end of the mark on the actuator's shaft then you have to compensate the other way. Get it as close or as bang on as you can.

I'm not sure if a millimetre or a fraction will matter but if you are reassembling your own core the bolt marks will already be on your core so you won't have to follow this step, just line them up perfectly and you will be done.

Anyway hope you get some use out of this. :)
 

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Awesome write up. Will you keep us updated on performance gain after fitting? I'm going to try and source a donor turbo and do this too..
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yeah sure. I'm getting it mapped so I will post back. If you let me know your turbo number and wether or not it has a vacuum or electronic actuator I may be able to provide more specific instructions. Fyi this is a gt1749v turbo number 750431 but this will cover the 717478 turbo too. Later electronic actuator models may be easier :)
 

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My current turbo number is 49135-05761. It's a Mitsubishi for the 318d (122 model). It has an electronic actuator and I want to replace it with the turbo from the 163 model, preferably with the 330d compressor like you have done. I also plan to use the FMIC from a 330d and replace injectors with those from a 320d or 330d and custom map. I might be asking too much from my engine, but have started the research too see if its financially viable, or better to cut my losses and just buy a 330d /335d.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Your not asking too much of your engine at all.. its essentially the same 2.0 engine as the 320d but with less power. Personally the 120/320 and 520 d injectors are the ones I would uee. You won't gain anything with the 3 litre ones, on the e46 they are the same or very similar anyway as the piston size is the same in the 6 cylinder 3.0 as the 4 cylinder 2.0 engine. I would suggest the 320d turbo but with a hybrid core like mine. I think the 3.0 turbine wheel is too big and you wouldnt see it kickig in until beyond 2000 rpm and you would lose out on a lot of low down power compared to just increasing the compressor wheel. I did consider that myself as I have a 3.0 turbo here, and it will bolt onto the manifold of the 2.0 but you then have the problem of the exhaust down pipe, you would have to have a custom down pipe made to fit it. Not to mention the actuator, on the electronic version I'm not sure it would fit the electronic connection or even work at all so you may have to fabricate a bracket to fit your 318d one and then find a way to set it up.
 

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Thanks for the advice. Yes it's the 320d 163bhp turbo I plan to fit, with the hybrid core like you have. Are you saying the electronic actuator on the 320d tirbo might not fit? Or the 330d turbo? I'd rather go with the garret variant too, but need to look into whether or not that would be a direct fit or if I need to get the Mitsubishi version.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
You might need to have a word with a turbo rebuild place to find out, you never know you might just be lucky. There are 4 different versions of turbo which will fit mine. Type your turbo number into ebay, tick the search title and description and look at the other compatible part numbers or compatible vehicles. See what you can dig up. I have a 2006 or 8 320d actuator here for the Mitsubishi type turbo if you would like a photo. I could take one if you would like to compare it to yours. The electronic connector is what I would look at :)

Its a shame I don't have the turbo still or I could have sent you that!
 

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A turbo with the right number has popped up on eBay tonight at a good price from a 120d, it comes with electronic actuator and looks to be the same fit as my existing one. Before I take the plunge and start investing in the project I have been doing some research and it looks like I might need to re calibrate the electronic actuator after fitting a new core. I may speak to a turbo specialist first as it could end up costing the same as a recon hybrid anyway after I fit a new core and have the housing machined out, especially if I will need to get someone to calibrate the actuator too..
 

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Discussion Starter #20
So they say, I think it could be done using a similar method to mine, but like I said you will have to be precise when aligning the actuator. When the actuator is in the parked position the alignment needs to be examined before dismantling so when you build the new one you get it spot on. You have to remember these guys are out to make money at the end of the day. I would personally try first, and if you think its not aligned then get it calibrated. But think about it. There is no stop for the actuator lever on the electronic model. If you get it right when building yours the only variable would be how your car moves the actuator. If the ecu was a variable in how it was calibrated then the turbo would have to be programmed whilst on the car, if not it would be calibrated on the turbo before you fit it. If thats the case you can do that yourself.. just have a think about it.. dont mention what I said just ask if it needs to be calibrated when its been fitted to the car or before you fit it.
 
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