1994 E36 320i Coupe - Which type of solder wire for ignition wire o-ring connector at starter motor? - Page 2

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Thread: 1994 E36 320i Coupe - Which type of solder wire for ignition wire o-ring connector at starter motor?

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    #11
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    Just re read your previous and regarding silver solder,it's exactly what it says on the tin,it contains silver and as such has a higher melting point.The advantage of this is it makes a stronger joint but this is only generally used for seam work.
    As to your question about flux---this stuff is used to prevent impurities entering the joint in much the same way arc welding rods work or using argon on mig welding,it creates a shield around the weld area.
    Even when i use solder with impregnated flux i always tend to add extra flux in paste form as a back up
    As i said earlier pm me and i will run through the do's and dont's
     
     

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    w4vy (13-07-2011)

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    #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by dellboy1959 View Post
    Personally i would go for a larger gauge than that as it will give you more scope for other jobs but it will still do what you are after..
    Can you confirm it's the ignition live wire to the solenoid that you are doing or are you on about the main feed to the starter.
    It's the thinist wire of the four wires that connects to the starter motor.

    This one:



    Thats the new o-ring that I crimped on, cheers.

    EDIT: I haven't bought the solder yet.

    Thanks Button Below, Be a Sport...
     
     

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    #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by w4vy View Post
    It's the thinist wire of the four wires that connects to the starter motor.

    This One m8:



    Cheers.
    Ok no probs you don't need much heat for that
    If you haven't already bought what you need i would defo go for a soldering gun rather than the old fashioned iron.Again read the destructions as if you keep the trigger held in you WILL burn it out.
    Don't worry too much about how many seconds it tells you to keep the trigger held for just keep holding and releasing the trigger.
    If your using the crimp type connector then remove the insulating plastic before you start as it will only melt anyway.Next you need to tin the cable,by this i mean you solder the cable first so it has a coating of solder this is where paste flux comes in handy as all you have to do is dip the wire in the pot to ensure a good coating.
    At this point i would apply more flux to the connector before starting.Your main problem here is what you hold the connector with as things like pliers will draw all the heat away.
    when i bought my gun it came with an aluminium tool for such a job but as a general rule you need something with fine grip.
    Lastly you need to heat the exact area that needs soldering until hot enough(the tinning on the cable is a good indicator as it will start to melt)
    When hot touch the cable with the solder as far back to the insulation as you can(not directly where the heat is) and if the temp is correct and the joint clean the solder will run towards the heat.Remove the heat and keep the joint still until it cools down------Job done apart from insulation tape
     
     

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    w4vy (13-07-2011)

  7.  
    #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by dellboy1959 View Post
    Ok no probs you don't need much heat for that
    If you haven't already bought what you need i would defo go for a soldering gun rather than the old fashioned iron.Again read the destructions as if you keep the trigger held in you WILL burn it out.
    Don't worry too much about how many seconds it tells you to keep the trigger held for just keep holding and releasing the trigger.
    If your using the crimp type connector then remove the insulating plastic before you start as it will only melt anyway.Next you need to tin the cable,by this i mean you solder the cable first so it has a coating of solder this is where paste flux comes in handy as all you have to do is dip the wire in the pot to ensure a good coating.
    At this point i would apply more flux to the connector before starting.Your main problem here is what you hold the connector with as things like pliers will draw all the heat away.
    when i bought my gun it came with an aluminium tool for such a job but as a general rule you need something with fine grip.
    Lastly you need to heat the exact area that needs soldering until hot enough(the tinning on the cable is a good indicator as it will start to melt)
    When hot touch the cable with the solder as far back to the insulation as you can(not directly where the heat is) and if the temp is correct and the joint clean the solder will run towards the heat.Remove the heat and keep the joint still until it cools down------Job done apart from insulation tape

    Cheers for that m8 but one thing I don't have any electric where the car is and can't move the car so I bought one of those Gas Soldering Pens, looks exactly like this one but I got mine from ebay, anyway so the technique would be different then I take it? Cheers.

    Thanks Button Below, Be a Sport...
     
     

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    #15
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    No, the technique is exactly the same regardless of soldering tool
     
     

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    w4vy (13-07-2011)

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