Anti Squeak compound, anti Seize and torque wrench

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  1. Anti Squeak compound, anti Seize and torque wrench 
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    Hi,

    I am possibly going to replace my brake pads and was just wondering where I get some anti-squeak compound and anti seize (without copper). Any ideas? Also do I need to use a torque wrench to secure the Caliper back on or can I just use a normal wrench?

    cheers
     
     

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    Anti squeak compound? Are you referring to that gel stuff that cures into rubber?
     
     

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    Don't know about the anti-sqeak/ anti seize but where possible I always use a torque wrench, however, (I apologise if you already know this) be aware that it is possible to damage the nut/ bolt if the thread is seized up or cross threaded so go easy and judge the situation. You'll get some kind of feel when you undo the bolts. I've also twisted the head off a bolt because the manual gave the wrong torque value. So in that particular case I'd have been better off using my instincts using an ordinary wrench and feeling the point at which it is tight enough.

    As an aside I needed to tighten up a 36mm wheel nut requiring some 280ft lbs and asked my local friendly garage if I could borrow their torque wrench. They hadn't got one in that range so advised I tighten the nut as hard as I could using an extened tube for leverage. Of course the language was a bit more fruity.
     
     

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    If you are concerned with using copper grease, there's a"metal-free" brake grease supplied by GSF, it's a Pagid product called Cera Tec.
     
     

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    shamM3 (08-02-2011)

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    cheers! As I understand it using anti seize with copper in means you get more rust.
     
     

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    copper cant rust, it will oxidise (turn green) but not rust

    and the fact its in grease makes it even less likly to rust

    We use copper grease on a lot of stuff at work, and it lives outside 365 days a year, we dont tend to get any issues with rust or oxidisation

    Thinking about it again, the reason we use coppaslip is because it stops corrosion, on things like bolt threads
     
     

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    Copper grease/coppa slip/anti seize (all the same stuff) will not rust due to the above mentioned reasons, hence why brake pipes are copper.

    As for a torque wrench i would say you won't need one. All your doing is removing two slide pins, an allen key would do. Just make sure it's a good quality good fiting allen key, when refitting just snug them up tight, they don't need to be ultra tight or anything.
    E39 M inspired
     
     

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronnie View Post
    If you are concerned with using copper grease, there's a"metal-free" brake grease supplied by GSF, it's a Pagid product called Cera Tec.
    Thats what i've been using, good thing about cera tec is you can't see its on the back of the pads unlike copper grease looks abit wa/|/k after a few days/weeks

    Some brake pads come with their own anti-squeal product. I used one that you rub on and it dries hard (blue in colour) was pretty good.
     
     

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    Ronnie (08-02-2011)

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    Quote Originally Posted by afcneal View Post
    Is that Viagra in a cream then?


    I knew someone was going to get the dirt out of that sentence
     
     

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    some info from another site "sorry" but if it helps, what the hell

    no grease on inner facing pad

    "The main reason you don't want to put the anti-squeak compound on the inward pad is because grease can cause the dust seal around the piston to swell up if it comes in contact with it - that's why it is fine on the other side but not on the piston side. It is ok to put a little on the face of the piston

    also dont grease the slide pins

    "Adding grease to the metal pin apparently can cause the rubber bushing to swell which increases friction and can cause the caliper to bind. (pads will drag and not release properly). Because the BMW design is more open than the typical metal-on-metal pins which also have seals to keep dirt out, grease can also attract dirt which will wear out the rubber bushing"

    this was a comment by our very own YORGI ... a very helpful fella

    cheers yorgi
     
     

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