98 E36 318is with GKD Supercharger - Page 3

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  1. BMW E36 Coupe Battery Relocate to Boot / Trunk 
    #21
    BMW Master
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    sjs202's Car Details
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    318is
    Year of Manufacture:
    1998
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    So the battery has now been moved! Quite a task in the end. Took me a few days to do it, but I was on holiday and taking things nice and leisurely! Here’s how it all went. This thread here also helped me prepare for the job: Relocating The Battery To The Cargo Area - 318ti.org forum. Sorry there aren’t so many pictures at the right points as I would like (I forget when I’m in the middle of a job), but there are a few.

    First off I had to find all the right bits. Here’s the final parts list, working from the trunk forwards:

    • Battery clamp and long bolt
    • Battery terminal bolts
    • Battery positive cable (including rubber grommet for firewall)
    • Plastic trim that bolts beside spare wheel well from Coupe car – has to be from a coupe in order for the battery cover to fit.
    • Battery cover – clips in to above part (replaces the ‘bin’ you get on the 4 cyl cars)
    • Trim holding cable against rear wheel arch in trunk
    • Plastic conduit for battery cable (through trunk bulkhead)
    • Battery distribution block (in engine bay).
    • Distribution block clamp, if you can find one – this is on the parts diagrams as item 23, but it can’t be selected by the dealers in the UK, so must be a US only part or something. I had to fabricate one from angle aluminium.
    • Square plastic plugs (white) for the self-tapping screws - there are two square holes for these on the inner wing panel, and are to attach the above clamp to the wing. There are a load of these holding bits on around the engine compartment, so you can take a couple from wherever you find them.
    • Distribution block covers.
    • Cable to starter motor
    • Cable to fusebox
    • Cable to DME (there wasn’t one long enough from the donor car, so I had to make my own).

    Other bits included a new battery – the old one won’t fit in the guides already in the trunk as it is too small, so I had to buy a brand new one for a 6 cylinder car (£116!!! :( ). But no bad thing having a bigger battery, especially if you’ve got ICE! And cable ties to neaten things up (lots!).

    First thing to do was to disconnect the old battery. I found at least one door has to be open at the time, or the alarm will go off for some reason! If you have a coupe that means the glass drops and doesn’t go back up, could be a problem if you’re leaving it overnight and it rains heavily. Luckily it didn’t.

    Then I removed the front driver’s seat (or passengers seat if you’re LHD!). Undid all the bolts (16mm socket) then rocked it backwards and unclipped the seatbelt pre-tensioner plug for the airbag system. If you don’t plug this back in before reconnecting the battery you will get a yellow SRS light on the dash which will need to be reset with some sort of special OBD tool (which I don’t have). Once the seat was out (it’s baaaastard heavy!), I removed the seatbelt bar, plastic trim at bottom of the door frame, trim panels below steering wheel and base of the accelerator pedal (pain in the arse – I found there is a plastic hinge that unclips on the back of the pedal base, and then it just pops out of the floor, wish I’d known that before!). The carpet could then be taken up and pushed towards the middle of the car.

    Next was to locate the firewall hole for the new battery line. This is a circular plate about 2 inches in diameter that needs to be punched out of the firewall to make the hole. Located just behind the accelerator pivot. Difficult to spot at first, a torch helps. A careful whack with a big screwdriver and hammer from inside the footwell will pop it out. Do it gently or it will fall and you’ll probably never see it again! (or use some duct tape to catch it).








    This left some bare metal showing. If you’ve read my other project thread you’ll know I’ve spent ages getting rid of rust, so now I’m always covering up any bare metal that gets exposed during work with the touch up pen so it doesn’t come back!!

    Once that was dry I could start laying the new battery cable. The one I got from a breakers was from a E36 touring, but they are exactly the same length. I added some black insulation tape to the sections with that horrible fabric insulation tape that goes sticky when it gets old, to save getting sticky muck everywhere. I started by shoving it from the footwell through the hole into the engine bay and seating the rubber grommet properly in the firewall. This gives you an idea of where the distribution block bracket needs to go (more on that later). Then I routed it through the floor towards the rear of the car, ensuring there were no kinks or twists in it, remembering how it routed through the plastic wiring trays on the floor from when I removed it at the breakers. It goes round the side of the rear seat, in front of the seatbelt buckle mount (not behind it):




    and through the rear bulkhead (the pics of the red car are actually the breaker I got the parts from, not mine):




    There is also a metal plate in the rear bulkhead that needs to be punched out in the same way as the firewall plate. Dockyard spanner and FO screwdriver out again. I stuck some duct tape on it beforehand so it wouldn’t drop and get lost in the chassis somewhere and rattle around.






    Touch up pen out again to cover up any bare metal. Then the plastic conduit can be placed in the hole (oor err missus). This conduit guides the battery cable through the bulkhead and stops it chafing on the sharp edges of the bulkhead. There is a green mark on the battery cable that lines up with where it goes through the bulkhead that indicates the cable is in the right position. It’s very important that the firewall and trunk bulkhead grommet/conduit tube are used and placed correctly, as the positive cable is un-fused and will cause a fire if it wears through and the copper wire touches the car body.

    Next the battery cable can be guided to the battery itself. I found it easiest to install the battery in the tray at this point as this will indicate exactly where the cable needs to end up. There is also a plastic piece of trim that holds the cable tight to the rear wheelarch. The pics below show where the cable goes round the wheel arch, but with the plastic trim removed. The studs you can see below from the donor car were not present on mine, so I bonded the trim in place using five minute epoxy.






    For the battery negative cable, the standard earth point stud is already located in the battery tray. So all is needed is to remove the nut and clean up the earth point with a dremel wire brush to get the contact shiny, and attach the same cable as used from the front battery location. I checked RealOEM to check the length and they are exactly the same part number. So that is the battery cable installed!

    Next for the distribution block in the engine bay and engine bay wiring. In order to mount the distribution block against the inner wing, I needed to fabricate a bracket, as I couldn’t get hold of the BMW part. Lots of measuring later, I ordered a 2 x 2 x 1/16 inch piece of angle aluminium and had a go at making something similar. Below is what I came up with, turned out very well! Also leaves enough room behind it for the bonnet windscreen washer lines. Forgot to take a photo of it before I installed it:








    Once the block is mounted, the cables can be installed. Looking at the donor car, these run from the distribution block, through the wiring loom tray attached to the scuttle panel and over to the other side of the engine bay to the fusebox and starter motor. It’s worth noting that I polished all of the terminals on these old cables with the dremel before fitting to clean them up, as I didn’t want problems with poor connections. To thread the cables trough the rubber conduits and tray is difficult but can be made a lot easier by greasing the cables slightly to make them go through easier. The cable for the starter motor was a pain as it’s really difficult to reach the bolt. I even considered removing the intake manifold at one point. It can just about be reached though, although you can’t actually see what you are doing, you just have to feel about with your fingers! The cable for the fusebox was easy compared to the above. There was however a cable with a ring terminal that attached to the old battery positive terminal you can see below:




    I assume this is for the DME. So this needed to be connected to the distribution block as well. As there wasn’t a cable from the breakers for this, I had to find the right type of cable and make one. I was aware that it needed to be exactly the same cable or thicker. I tried everywhere to get the right gauge cable: Halfords, Maplins, 3 local motor spares shops and two electricians, all of which were a no go. I eventually found an auto electrical website and found out that it was thin sheath 84 strand 50 amp cable. Two minutes and £10 later it was ordered and arrived first thing the next day. Last time I hunt round shops for silly bits like that! I made up a new length of cable with a ring terminal and heat-shrink on one end, and crimped it at the other. Then refitted the loom tray to the scuttle and tidied everything up with convoluted tubing and cable ties. Now looks like this in the engine bay:






    Having now moved the battery, the 4 gauge line for the sound system from the engine bay to the trunk was no longer needed, so that was removed, cut down to size and joined to the battery in its new place. I thought that this would cut down the length of the sound system power line (and hence resistance) quite a bit, however it was only 2 metres shorter in the end because of how it routes through the trunk. But every little bit helps I suppose! The sound system line is the extra fused line you can see below:




    And here is the battery area with the cover installed:




    Just before I carried this work out, the battery kept going flat after only two days. I suspected the culprit was the power capacitor for the stereo, so unplugged it. Sure enough the battery then held its charge, so the power cap is now duff. I think the dielectric inside breaks down over time and allows it to leak. Annoying as it was £40 to start with, and a pain to install! I will leave it for now though, as I now have a bigger battery anyway, and HID lights (which shouldn’t dim with bass drops as they have their own ballasts). I have also read conflicting info. on power caps on the internet, some say they work and make a difference, others say that they don’t. But I have yet to find an article arguing against the use of power caps for sound systems that isn’t written by a complete arse in a patronising, sh*tty way! If anyone has trawled through the dross and knows of a site that will just give the facts, let me know!

    It was handy the glovebox had been removed to get to the old sound system cable, as I thought I'll need to recode the alarm key fob now the battery has been disconnected. But when I reconnected the battery, I found the fob still worked. However I had a spare fob that I had spilt a drink on years ago and shorted it out which I’d never got round to fixing. I cleaned it out inside and put a new battery in it, and thought I’d have a go at coding both alarm fobs. This thread helped me with this: E36 Alarm Identification Guide - 3T, 2T, 3G EWS. Mine is the later EWS II 3G system with the black box behind the glovebox and coding switch. The procedure I followed was:

    • Sit in the passenger seat with both fobs to hand and both doors open.
    • Removed the rubber plug.
    • Flicked the switch across – the hazard lights and alarm led then flashed a few times.
    • I pressed the red button on the first fob (nothing happened) and then the red button on the second fob (again nothing happened).
    •Then flicked the switch back across. At this point the system armed itself and the alarm sounded. I pressed the grey button on one of the fobs to silence it, and the grey button again to disarm it.

    After the above both fobs now work! Tidied up the wiring and then reinstalled the glovebox. Other work in the foot-wells I did at the same time whilst the trim was out was to remove the tweeter mounts and spray them black. Infinity speaker mounts are usually silver and it bugged me. Two coats of primer and then two of satin black and they look much better and no longer annoyingly catch your eye:




    Whilst the driver’s seat was out I also installed the fire extinguisher and mounting plate that I had bought from BMW. £80 all in, but I needed an new one anyway and didn’t like the way id mounted it in the footwell. After fitting I don’t think it can be done with the seat installed so it was a good time to do it. Looks good now, tucked under the seat and out of the way: Got several jobs done at the same time over these three days!




    So I refitted the carpets and driver’s seat and started up to test everything worked. Started first time. Battery reading just over 14 volts at idle so all looked fine. After refitting everything back in its place, including seatbelt mounting, carpets, door side trims, driver’s seat bolts, trunk wheel arch trim, rear seat, and tidying up the sound system cabling, a good vacuum and fully securing the battery clamps (and greasing), I took it for a test drive to double check everything was working as it should. No problems at all. The only thing I noticed was some interference through the stereo that is linked to engine speed. This was there before the battery move but is now slightly louder. It doesn’t increase in volume with the stereo, so I suspect it may be interference through the antenna. I’ll remove the head unit soon and unplug the antenna, and if that gets rid of the noise that will confirm. I don’t actually know where the antenna is on the E36, I read somewhere it uses the rear window heating element as the antenna but can anyone confirm this? I feel an aftermarket antenna will be on the cards as the Nakamichi head unit never has picked up any radio at all which is annoying when you’re on the move and bored of a cd!. I won’t be drilling holes in any bodywork though so perhaps an aftermarket window stick on type one if I can find something like that.

    So all in all, a successful few days! Thanks for looking, all comments welcomed both good and bad!
     
     

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  3. BMW E36 Walbro Fuel Pump Replace / Upgrade 
    #22
    BMW Master
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    sjs202's Car Details
    Model of Car:
    318is
    Year of Manufacture:
    1998
    Transmission Type:
    Manual
    Car Body Type:
    Coupe

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    This is the final thing left to do before going to fit the supercharger kit! I am using a BEGI FMU for the install, which is a RRFPR, as I want to try using the standard ECU first – hopefully it will not run lean on boost with this set up, but will see when we get to the rolling road test stage. Downing Atlanta used this setup on their kits without problems, so am not too concerned, but will have to wait and see.

    It’s best to install an upgraded fuel pump so there is lots of pressure available when the FMU calls for it. Best to also renew the fuel filter at the same time, but I had already had this done at the last service in February (and she’s hardly done any miles since).

    The pump I went for was the Walbro GSS342. Thanks to M44Lee for helping to find that! This came with a small fitting kit. I have read that it may run a little rich at idle with this pump but will have to see. I also bought a new fuel pump locking ring and rubber sealing ring from BMW for re-fitting. This is how I did it all:

    Before starting, depressurise the fuel system by first removing the fuel pump fuse. It is a 15 amp fuse and was in slot 18 on my car. Then, start the engine and wait for it to stall (mine didn’t actually start as it had been left for a few days). After it stalls, crank it over one more time to ensure all remaining pressure is gone. Then remove the fuel filler cap to relieve any pressure in the tank. Replace the cap. That's it.

    Next, disconnect the battery negative cable, and leave for at least 30 minutes, this lets any capacitors in the cars electrics to fully discharge. Ideal time for a cup of tea (and a fag if you smoke, as you soon won’t be able to for a bit!). During this operation there will be an open tank of gas so it’s important to be careful:

    • Take off rings and watches
    • No belts with big metal buckles!
    • No mobile phones or other electronics
    • No lighters (obvious, but I’d got so used to using one for heat-shrink tubing on the last job that I made a point of taking it out of my pocket, in case I got it out and used it for heat shrink without thinking and blew the place up!!)
    • When using hammer and screwdriver (needed for this job) make sure the screwdriver handle is plastic – to avoid any sparking by hitting metal together!
    • Work in a well ventilated area – leave the doors open (but not windows as remember the battery has been disconnected!).
    • Make sure you are earthed, so don’t wear shoes that you know create a lot of static. To be extra safe, if it’s a nice day take your shoes off!
    • Have a fire extinguisher or two handy in case the worst happens
    • Let people around you know what you will be doing (so matey doesn’t wander up to you with a fag in hand! ‘weeey, wot have we ‘ere then!!’).
    • Have a cap of some sort to put over the fuel tank opening whilst you are working on the pump. Needs to be about the same size as the locking ring (like the below Tupperware lid I found in the kitchen!)




    The above might be overkill really, but i'm always extra careful!

    First job is to remove the passenger seat bench, and then the sound deadening over the fuel pump access hatch (it isn’t glued down here so will just fold backwards). Next, undo the four screws holding the hatch on and disconnect the electrical plugs from the fuel pump, noting where they plug in. Then lift the hatch away and put to one side. I got the vacuum cleaner out at this point and sucked away the dust around the fuel pump top and had a general clean up, as I didn’t want any crud falling into the tank. Next, remove and replace the fuel filler cap one last time to relieve any pressure in the fuel tank. Then, loosen the jubilee clip and remove the fuel delivery hose from the fuel pump assembly – be prepared for a spill so have a rag handy. I used a M8 bolt to bung the hose.

    Next the locking ring needs to be unscrewed. BMW recommend a special tool to the dealers for this, but you can do it with a big flat head screwdriver (with a plastic handle!) and hammer – place the screwdriver against one of the tabs on the ring and tap it to loosen it. It may be quite tight so may take some persuasion, but it will go. When its loose enough undo the rest by hand.

    Remove the locking ring and place to one side. The fuel pump assembly can now be lifted out of the tank. Lift the assembly straight upwards. The float arm for the level sender unit will need to be moved inwards to make enough room to get the assembly out, take care not to bend or damage it. Place the assembly to one side on a clean rag or towel in a well ventilated area and allow any fuel remaining on it to evaporate.

    There is now an open tank of fuel so this will need to be covered up. Take your makeshift cap and place it over the hole in the fuel tank (make sure it is clean first!). Then put something heavy on top of it to seal it:




    I used some old books (that is my old school dictionary – think this is the first time it’s actually been used since then!). This will keep the fuel tank relatively safe whilst you are working on the pump assembly.

    Now the old pump needs to be removed from the plastic mounting. But before you do this take a note of how far down the stock pump sits in the mounting, so that you can fit the new pump at the same height in the fuel tank. Push out the rubber vibration mountings and free the plastic sleeve from the unit. Then pull off the plastic fuel tube from the top of the pump, and finally pull the pump from the plastic sleeve.

    The Walbro pump is thinner than the standard one:

    [/URL]


    But the kit comes with a foam sleeve to fit round the pump so it fits snugly in the sleeve. I positioned the sleeve level with the measurement mark I had made on the pump so it would be sitting at the same height in the tank.

    Finally for the wiring. I wanted to make it so that the standard pump could go back in if required. So I did not want to cut off the spade terminals from the standard wiring. What I did was cut the wiring on the walbro plug loom down to size and installed female spade terminals on there so it could plug onto the stock wires. I then covered the terminals in heat shrink wrap (I was surprised to find the stock terminals un-insulated to be honest). I also placed some convoluted tubing around one of the wires so that even if the heat shrink did chafe through (unlikely anyway) they still would not short out:




    I also used a jubilee clip on the fuel hose union to the Walbro pump, even though there isn’t one present on the stock unit. Ready to go back in the tank:




    Then it's simply a case of refitting the pump assembly back into the fuel tank, making sure that the float arm for the sender unit isn’t caught in the swirl pot in the tank and is free to float. I used a new rubber sealing ring and lock ring from BMW for refitting.

    I then plugged the fuel line back in to the pump and the electrical plugs. Finally reconnected the battery and refitted the fuse and started her up. Took a few cranks but started first time. I let it run for a few minutes and checked for leaks from any hoses under the car or engine bay – none found. So then refitted the rear trim and seat etc. and cleared up.

    Then took it for a test drive. I wasn’t expecting any difference but the car feels much more eager now! Especially at lower revs, pulls much better. I had noticed the car was a bit sluggish at times over the last couple of years. I guess 15 year old fuel pump versus brand new! So even if you’re not going for any other tuning options I would recommend an upgraded fuel pump, as it seems it may make quite a difference on these old cars now.

    With hindsight, I am hoping the pump will not slip down the tank in its sleeve. Also hope the fuel does not eat the foam sleeve away over time. Perhaps I should of used a new piece of rubber fuel line cut down to size, as that would act to stop the pump slipping in the sleeve. I hope it will all be fine but I guess time will tell.

    The next post will be the supercharger install, now scheduled in for November all things being well. May post up a couple of pics of the charger before then! One last trip to the breakers is required to source an M44 airbox I can modify. Will also see if there is an undamaged nose cone around too, as it’s about time I sorted mine.

    Thanks for reading, all comments welcome!
     
     

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  5.  
    #23
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    m44lee's Car Details
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    glad you got the fuel pump sorted n glad I could help ;-) I look forward to seeing the install n vids when your done ;-)

    SUPERCHARGED 318IS
     
     

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    sjs202 (12-11-2013)

  7.  
    #24
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    Cheers mate! It's running great with that pump fitted!

    The car will soon be laid up in the garage once I've cleared it out, ready to start proper work.

    How's yours running? Still all good?
     
     

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    m44lee (08-12-2013)

  9.  
    #25
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    yes mate mines still running well! my starter motor is giving up on me but i'm holding out till after xmas as it'll be changed with a new clutch and fly that i'm planning

    SUPERCHARGED 318IS
     
     

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    sjs202 (24-11-2013)

  11.  
    #26
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    Noticed strange gurgling / gushing noise every now and then from the fuel tank. So I've had the pump out again this weekend to see if anythings amiss. All looks fine, the pump had moved very slightly in its mountings but other than that I can't see anything wrong. I rigged up a strap with cable ties to stop the pump from slipping down, something I wanted to do anyway as I wasn't 100% happy with it from last time:



    But can't think what the odd noise could be then. Happens only occasionally. Had an idea that it could be the fuel pressure regulator protesting - perhaps it doesn't like the higher flow rate? Will just leave it for the moment.
     
     

  12.  
    #27
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    On to other more fun things, Peter spent a couple of hours with me building the kit on the work bench last weekend, so I now know how it all fits together. Here is the charger kit assembled!



    It's quite neat and compact once it's all together. Doesn't weigh much either. And that of course is the charger I bought back in January, looks hardly used at all! The guy I got it from said he put the JCW supercharger kit from BMW on his Cooper S only a couple months after he bought the car new. So it has very few miles on it. It's all got to come apart again to fit the crankcase vent valve which bolts onto the back of the throttle plenum (can't see it on the above photo).

    A few things left to do now before fitting. Finish clearing out the garage so I can put the bimmer in there to work on it. And also to get an extra O2 sensor bung welded into the exhaust CAT section for an AFR gauge. I'm sure Vortex in Grays will be able to do this, as they fitted the system. Haven't asked them yet though, will call them this week and see if they're up for it! I will get it welded into the existing cat section rather than a new sports one (which I'd like to get made ideally), but this way if I ruin the existing cat during setup (by running too rich for too long for example) it won't matter too much. Can also see how the standard one copes with the heat too.

    One other thing is I'm going for the GKD coil on plug kit, and would like to run with that for a bit first to see how much difference it makes. This uses the coils from the M3.

    So it'll be a little while still but it's starting to come together now!
     
     

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  14.  
    #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by sjs202 View Post
    Noticed strange gurgling / gushing noise every now and then from the fuel tank. So I've had the pump out again this weekend to see if anythings amiss. All looks fine, the pump had moved very slightly in its mountings but other than that I can't see anything wrong. I rigged up a strap with cable ties to stop the pump from slipping down, something I wanted to do anyway as I wasn't 100% happy with it from last time:



    But can't think what the odd noise could be then. Happens only occasionally. Had an idea that it could be the fuel pressure regulator protesting - perhaps it doesn't like the higher flow rate? Will just leave it for the moment.
    Is the pump 'facing' the correct way?
    I have also uprated my in tank pump for a Whalbro 255, but it is facing the opposite direction from yours (spun 180 degrees) in the carrier,
    I.E. The pick up filter 'sack' is pointing the other way - towards the rear of the car once inserted into the tank.
     
     

  15.  
    #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jackmcl View Post
    Is the pump 'facing' the correct way?
    I have also uprated my in tank pump for a Whalbro 255, but it is facing the opposite direction from yours (spun 180 degrees) in the carrier,
    I.E. The pick up filter 'sack' is pointing the other way - towards the rear of the car once inserted into the tank.

    I see what you mean. But it's currently facing forward - so the inlet port on the pump is nearest the tank bottom and the pickup sock angled downwards. That's how the stock one was mounted anyway.

    I wouldn't want to change it round, as the inlet port would then sit higher in the tank and the filter sock would be sticking up, which would mean more chance of sucking air in when the tank level gets low?
     
     

  16.  
    #30
    BMW Maestro
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    m44lee's Car Details
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    1999
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    it has to face that way or the filter wouldn't sit in the bit where its supposed to ie in here



    and I look forward to seeing the quality of the COP conversion as this was something I am considering myself

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  17. The Following User Says Thank You to m44lee For This Useful Post:

    sjs202 (12-01-2014)

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