2006 E90/91 330d and hybrid turbo

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  1. 2006 E90/91 330d and hybrid turbo 
    #1
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    mark4's Car Details
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    Does anyone run, or have any experience of running a hybrid turbo on the 2005-2008 3.0d M57?

    I saw this and has made me very curious.

    Was going to go for just and ECU remap, but a turbo upgrade just might keep those power demons at bay!

    Who would know how to properly remap this baby?
     
     

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    matthew_henson's Car Details
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    The problem you will find when you start adding performance turbos is just what else you need to change and still have a reliable car. To get more than 300bhp off a 330d you need more charge pressure and you will find that the stock induction system and manifolds on both side probably won't take the pressure increase.

    Power in car is subject to the square law, if you try and double the power you quadruple the cost and so on (hence why a Bugatti Veron costs £1M)

    So in order to get a Hybrid high boost turbo to deliver the power you are looking for, you will have to start thinking about new exhaust and inlet manifolds to cope with the increased pressur, new exhaust system to allow the gas flow, new intercooler and induction hoses, new cylinder head studs/gaskets and a custom map. The other issue is just what kind of power curve you will get off a single turbo, you will probably find the turbo lag is painful and the power strikes at a certain rpm and last but not least, you would need to think about brakes, bearings and bushes to cope with the power/torque going through propshaft and diff.

    It it worth it? probably easier to buy an M3 are just be happy with a standard re-map
    Last edited by matthew_henson; 29-08-2011 at 11:15.
     
     

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    mark4's Car Details
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    Quote Originally Posted by matthew_henson View Post
    The problem you will find when you start adding performance turbos is just what else you need to change and still have a reliable car. To get more than 300bhp off a 330d you need more charge pressure and you will find that the stock induction system and manifolds on both side probably won't take the pressure increase.

    Power in car is subject to the square law, if you try and double the power you quadruple the cost and so on (hence why a Bugatti Veron costs £1M)

    So in order to get a Hybrid high boost turbo to deliver the power you are looking for, you will have to start thinking about new exhaust and inlet manifolds to cope with the increased pressur, new exhaust system to allow the gas flow, new intercooler and induction hoses, new cylinder head studs/gaskets and a custom map. The other issue is just what kind of power curve you will get off a single turbo, you will probably find the turbo lag is painful and the power strikes at a certain rpm and last but not least, you would need to think about brakes, bearings and bushes to cope with the power/torque going through propshaft and diff.

    It it worth it? probably easier to buy an M3 are just be happy with a standard re-map
    I hoped there would be little extra work other the bolting on the new turbo, getting the correct ECU tuning, perhaps with 335d injectors - and using a slightly milder state of tune - say 300bhp with as linear delivery as possible. I think I read somewhere that the compressor is a garrett GT ball-bearing model, which in an ideal world would cancel effects of lag caused by a larger housing or more resistant turbine (crosses fingers).

    I agree that all the additional modifications you mention should be taken into account - but I have seem Maps claiming 300bhp with the standard setup. What you are suggesting seems like a MAJOR modification. For that setup I'd want to be doubling my output.

    I'm running an auto box, so I am more concerned about the torque converter coping with the increased strain.

    Maybe that remap isn't such a bad option!

    Seriously though - Get an M3? Honestly have you seen the cost of fuel these days? This is my first diesel and up till now I have been a die-hard petrol head! I have just come back from a 250 mile journey - avg 45mpg. I don't think there is any going back now - unless I'm gifted a company fuel card, then it will be a supercharged V8 Alpina all the way...
     
     

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    #4
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    The turbo lag in larger turbo is caused by two things, the dynamic efficiency of the turbo; in simple language the sweet spot for most boost is never at low speeds and so you need a lot of exhaust gas energy before it translate that energy in to inlet air pressure. At low speeds it is just not efficient at converting exhaust gas in to blowing air in to the engine.

    Secondly it is not the bearings that matter, it is the mass and diameter of the impellers, the bigger they are the more inertia they have and so the longer it take for them to get spinning fast. Oil journal bearing are pretty frictionless and very smooth which is why they are used for crankshafts.

    If you look at all the high reving super powered turbo engines they all peak quite sharply at higher revs. Again hence why BMW has chosen the twin turbo design, you can go with a single big turbo but it will be pretty tough to drive, kind of no power, no power, f**k..... what was that as your head is pinned to the seat. Reminiscent of the old 2002 Turbo, it was a beast in that regard

    Be happy with a simple remap and save up for a 535d
     
     

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